Install Cockpit on Debian 12 Bookworm

Cockpit is a web-based management tool for Linux systems. It aims to simplify management tasks while maintaining compatibility with other administration tools.

Step 1

Cockpit requires the use of the firewalld service to be able to make changes to your firewall rules.

If you are using ufw as a host-based firewall

Remove ufw before replacing it with firewalld.

$ sudo apt-get remove --purge --yes ufw

Install firewalld as a host-based firewall

Install firewalld and maintain ssh access as well as enabling cockpit to receive incoming connections.

$ sudo -- bash -c 'apt-get install --show-progress --yes firewalld && systemctl enable --now firewalld.service && firewall-cmd --zone=public --add-service=ssh --permanent && firewall-cmd --zone=public --add-service=cockpit --permanent && firewall-cmd --reload && firewall-cmd --info-zone=public'

Step 2

Proceed to install Cockpit and selected add-on applications.

$ sudo apt-get install --show-progress --yes cockpit cockpit-machines cockpit-pcp nullmailer ssh tuned-utils

Step 3

By default, the Cockpit web console listens on port 9090 for connections. If you want to make changes from the default, use the following command to edit /etc/systemd/system/cockpit.socket.d/override.conf.

$ sudo systemctl edit cockpit.socket

The example below changes the web console port from 9090 to 9091 and restricts access to the localhost.

### Editing /etc/systemd/system/cockpit.socket.d/override.conf
### Anything between here and the comment below will become the new contents of the file

[Socket]
ListenStream=
ListenStream=127.0.0.1:9091

### Lines below this comment will be discarded

Use the following command for your changes to take effect.

$ sudo -- bash -c 'systemctl daemon-reload && systemctl restart cockpit.socket && systemctl status cockpit.socket'

Step 4

If you installed Cockpit on the local machine and changed the listening port to 9091, you can now access the Cockpit web console on https://localhost:9091.

What’s your favourite desktop and why?

In response to Voice of the Masses

My favourite Desktop is Unity because it is not MATE. This has been bugging me for quite some time.
Like almost everyone else on the planet, I was unhappy when in 2011 Canonical declared Unity Ubuntu’s new default desktop. After years of using GNOME 2, I just thought that Unity felt a bit awkward. But I stuck with it, mainly for a perceived lack of alternatives and my wish to avoid PPAs if at all possible.
Fast-forward a few years and, thanks to the excellent Martin Wimpress, I hear of MATE Desktop Environment almost every other podcast I listen to. With the release of Ubuntu 15.10, MATE is finally elevated to official flavour status and I was sure to be making the switch away from Unity.
I ended up using MATE for about one day before going back to Unity. It was quite an uncomfortable thing to have to admit, but there was a problem: After years of using Unity, I just thought that MATE felt a bit awkward…
ubuntu-mate.org

What exactly is LaTeX for?

“Many people discover LaTeX after years of struggling with wordprocessors and desktop publishing systems, and are amazed to find that TeX has been around for over 25 years and they hadn’t heard of it.”
Peter Flynn

LaTeX is a free document preparation system that enables you to create beautifully typeset pages. It implements a set of commands designed to control TeX, the typesetting engine developed by Donald E Knuth. LaTeX stores the information about your documents as plain text, thus avoiding the risk of vendor lock-in and ensuring that your documents will still be editable twenty years from now. LaTeX processes the plain text data and, with pdfTeX working in the background, generates PDF output of the highest typographic quality—perfect for viewing on-screen or printing on paper. LaTeX runs on many platforms and is included as standard with most Linux distributions. Ready-to-run LaTeX systems are also available for Windows and Mac OS X.
miktex.org, tug.org/mactex

Ubuntu Linux is for everyone

Ubuntu is a relatively new flavour of Linux. Since the release of ‘Warty Warthog’ in October 2004, it has become the most popular Linux distribution worldwide. Similar to its parent, Debian GNU/Linux, Ubuntu is based entirely on free software. It inherits outstanding package management and provides one-click access to thousands of downloadable applications. Ubuntu 8.10 (Intrepid Ibex) is the latest version and available for download from today.
www.ubuntu.com